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Implementing the NICE Guidance & updated Quality Standard on Diabetic Foot Problems Prevention and Management

Friday 6 October 2017
De Vere West One Conference Centre, London

Implementing the NICE Guidance & updated Quality Standard on Diabetic Foot Problems Prevention and Management
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“If we can ensure patients with diabetes have the appropriate, high quality care they deserve across the country then we can prevent amputations,..There are several steps we can take to ensure this happens, one of which is to ensure that those presenting with active diabetic foot disease have rapid access to a multidisciplinary diabetic foot service. Higher mortality rates are thought to be related to heart disease and therefore we also need to ensure the all-round health of the patient is cared for, including addressing their overall cardiovascular disease risk.” Professor Jonathan Valabhji, NHS England’s National Clinical Director for Diabetes and Obesity

“More than 60,000 people with diabetes in England are thought to have foot ulcers at any given time. In 2014-15 the annual cost of diabetic foot disease to the NHS in England was estimated at £1 billion, in addition to the personal/social costs of reduced mobility and sickness absence. Only around half of people with diabetes who have had a diabetic foot ulcer survive for 5 years. Only half of patients with diabetes who have had an amputation survive for 2 years.” National Diabetes Foot Care Audit, March 2017

This conference focuses on improving practice in the prevention and management of diabetic foot problems including implementing the updated NICE guideline, Quality Standard, and operational framework to improve care for patients with diabetic foot disease. Through national updates, extended focus sessions and practical case studies the conference will update delegates on best practice in improving the care of patients with and at risk of diabetic foot problems.

The conference will also update delegates on findings and implementation of the recommendations from the National Diabetes Foot Care Audit which was published in March 2017. The audit found that nationally recommended care structures in place for the management of diabetic foot disease are often not in place and  “the basic framework for effective prevention and management of diabetic foot disease often seems to be missing”. The Audit also found that “Two-fifths of the ulcer episodes referred by a health professional had an interval of two or more weeks before their first expert assessment (40 per cent). Almost one-third of ulcer episodes were self-referred (30 per cent). Self-referring patients were less likely to have severe ulcers (34 per cent). Patients not seen for two months or more were most likely to have severe ulcers (58 per cent).” National Diabetes Foot Care Audit March 2017

“More than 135 people with diabetes have a leg, foot or toe amputated each week. This is shocking, especially as four out of five of these amputations are preventable.” Diabetes UK

“100 diabetes related amputations take place in the UK each week. 80% of these could be prevented if people were more aware of the risk and knew how to minimise it.”  NHS England 

100% of delegates who attended a previous conference on this topic would recommend to a colleague

“excellent, will take a lot of points forward to trust”

“mentally stimulating, good range of speakers… very relevant and motivating day”

“the conference was excellent, lots of things learned, nothing to improve”

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