Skip navigation

IV Therapy: Implementing the NICE Guideline & Quality Standard Conference

Chaired by Jackie Nicholson, Chair, National Infusion and Vascular Access Society (NIVAS) and Nurse Consultant Vascular Access, St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust today’s one day conference focussed on advancing IV Therapy including implementing the NICE Guideline and Quality Standards for IV Therapy.

Jackie Nicholson, Chair, National Infusion and Vascular Access Society (NIVAS) and Nurse Consultant Vascular Access, St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust opened the conference with a presentation on ‘IV Therapy and the care of vascular access devices: a national and international perspective’ and discussed, innovations, developments and research.

Jackie Nicholson Full Presentation Click Here

Jackie Nicholson Biography:

Jackie is a Nurse Consultant in Vascular Access at St George’s NHS Healthcare Trust. Since taking up the post in June 2013, Jackie has continued to develop a team that places a variety of vascular access devices including ultrasound guided peripheral cannulas, midlines, PICCs, skin tunnelled catheters, implanted ports, acute and dialysis catheters. Jackie comes from a background in intensive care and began to specialise in vascular access in 2006 when she set up a PICC and midline service at the Royal Surrey County Hospital. Jackie has written for publication and is on the editorial board for the Intravenous Therapy Supplement of the British Journal of Nursing. Jackie is a regular speaker at both national and international conferences and is the chair of the National Infusion and Vascular Access Society (NIVAS).

The NICE Quality Standard on Intravenous fluid therapy in adults in hospitals recommends that adults receiving IV fluid therapy in hospital should be cared for by healthcare professionals competent in assessing patients’ fluid and electrolyte needs, prescribing and administering IV fluids, and monitoring patient response. An IV fluid management plan, determined by and reviewed by an expert, which includes the fluid and electrolyte prescription over the next 24 hours and arrangements for assessing patients and monitoring their plan should be drawn up for all adults receiving IV fluid therapy in hospital. Any clear incidents of fluid mismanagement in adults who receive IV fluid therapy in hospital should be reported as critical incidents, according to the quality standard.

Andrew Barton, Advanced Nurse Practitioner in Vacular Access and IV Therapy, Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust followed on from Jackie with a presentation on ‘NICE guideline and quality standards for IV fluid therapy in adults in hospital’ and discussed why the Guideline and Quality Standards are needed, 10 key priorities for implementation, moving forward and Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust experience of implementation.

Andrew Barton, Advanced Nurse Practitioner in Vacular Access and IV Therapy, Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust ‘NICE guideline and quality standards for IV fluid therapy in adults in hospital’ Full Presentation Click Here

NICE recently stated that there is a clear need for guidance on IV fluid therapy and the new quality standard and guideline is expected to contribute to improvements in the following outcomes, Mortality or serious harm resulting from errors in IV fluid therapy. Patient experience of hospital care; Patient safety incidents reported and Length of hospital stay. The NICE Quality Statements are:

  • Statement 1. Hospitals have an intravenous (IV) fluids lead who has overall responsibility for training, clinical governance, audit and review of IV fluid prescribing, and patient outcomes.
  • Statement 2. Adults receiving IV fluid therapy in hospital are cared for by healthcare professionals competent in assessing patients’ fluid and electrolyte needs, prescribing and administering IV fluids, and monitoring patient response.
  • Statement 3. Adults receiving IV fluid therapy in hospital have an IV fluid management plan, determined by and reviewed by an expert, which includes the fluid and electrolyte prescription over the next 24 hours and arrangements for assessing patients and monitoring their plan.
  • Statement 4. For adults who receive IV fluid therapy in hospital, clear incidents of fluid mismanagement are reported as critical incidents.

Following the morning tea break Andrew Barton, Advanced Nurse Practitioner in Vacular Access and IV Therapy, Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust continued the conference with an in-depth presentation on ‘Ensuring appropriate use of IV therapy in line with the recent Guidance Developing an IV fluid management plan for every patient’ and discussed:

  • developing an IV fluid management plan for every patient
  • monitoring care against the plan
  • the role of risk assessments in IV therapy
  • tips and advice for safe and effective IV Therapy in practice
  • communicating effectively with patients
  • Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust approach and how we are monitoring adherence to the NICE Guideline

Andrew Barton, Advanced Nurse Practitioner in Vacular Access and IV Therapy, Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust ‘Ensuring appropriate use of IV therapy in line with the recent Guidance Developing an IV fluid management plan for every patient’ Full Presentation Click Here

Future events of interest:

Advancing IV Therapy
Wednesday 21 September 2016
Hallam Conference Centre, London


14 April 2016

 PreviousNext 

    Partner Organisations

    The Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation TrustInPracticeClinical Audit Support CentrePlayoutJust For Nurses
    GGI (Good Governance Institute) accredited conferences CPD Member ASGBI (Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland) professional partner BADS (British Association of Day Surgery) accredited conferences